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  • A Three-Stage Lead Nurturing Strategy Anyone Can Use
    TriMark office space

By Megan Burgess, Content Strategist

If someone has reached the lead nurturing stage of your sales process, they’re aware of your business or service, but they don’t know everything about you. In fact, they may not know much aside from your name and a general idea of what you do.

Lead nurturing is how you educate prospective customers or clients about what you do, why you do it, how it works, and, most importantly, why any of it matters to them. It’s an extremely important part of turning a prospect into a loyal customer.

While it’s important, it doesn’t have to be complicated. We’ll break down the three stages of lead nurturing and how to turn a “maybe” into a “yes!” at each step. (This approach was created by Ken Krogue, co-founder of Inside Sales. We have expanded on it.)

A Lead Nurturing Strategy in Three Steps

These are the stages in which someone interacts with your business. In the first stage, they don’t know a lot about you. Your goal is to provide more and more information with each stage, allowing them to make an informed decision. Here are those three stages and what you can do for prospective customers at each one to nurture them to a sale.

1. Interest

At this stage, people are interested in your business, but they may not know very much about you. They don’t have enough information to make a purchase yet. They want and need to know more.

This is your chance to explain your offering, including the benefits of your product(s) and service(s). In short, why is what you do important? You can answer these questions on a variety of platforms in a variety of ways: social media, website content, email marketing, print and more.

Consider creating a series of social media posts, videos, animations or emails about the basics of your business and a few benefits. This could also be a blog post or page on your website where you point people who need a “crash course” on your business.

This social ad from KOHLER Power Reserve does a great job of answering a frequently asked question in a quick clip.

Important Dos and Don’ts During This Stage:

  • DO use vivid language. As the saying goes, paint a picture for your customers.
  • DON’T use jargon. Jargon and industry-specific terms only confuse people who aren’t in the industry, like your customers.
  • DO talk about the benefits of your product, but keep those benefits concrete. Use numbers and statistics when possible.
  • DON’T overwhelm your audience with information. At this stage, stick to the top 2-3 benefits. You’ll have the opportunity to tell them more later.

2. Understanding

At this stage, people know what you do and are aware of your product, but they probably don’t fully understand it. They may know you paint homes, install windows, or make high-quality handbags, but they aren’t sure what sets you apart from your competitors.

This is your opportunity to explain what makes your business special.

Here are some examples of questions to answer to better help people understand your business:

  • Do you offer free consultations?
  • How do you help customers decide which service/product would be best for them?
  • What is your delivery timeline? How long does it take to start using your product/service from the point of purchase?
  • What are your qualifications/certifications? Are you licensed/insured? (If applicable.)
  • What is your return/refund policy? Do you offer a warranty?

This video from Window World of Colorado takes a complex topic (energy efficiency) and explains it in a way that is easy to understand. It’s also versatile enough to be used across their website, social, or email campaigns.

Important Dos and Don’ts During This Stage:

  • DO listen to your customers. Create content that answers questions that real people have asked about your business. If one person has asked it, there are likely many more who kept their question to themselves.
  • DON’T get too bogged down in details at this stage. Give prospective customers the information they want, but don’t provide information that doesn’t serve them yet. For example, prospective customers might not need to know what installation of your product entails at this stage.
  • DO get creative with the way you present this information. How can you tell – or better yet, show – your audience what you’re all about and what they can expect?
  • DON’T put this information in just one place. You will likely need to repeat key information in several places across your website, ads and customer communications.

3. Relevance

Customers care about you, but they care about themselves a lot more. They want to know how your service or product can solve a problem for them

This is where your communication gets more personal. Speak directly to your customers and address their pain points.

Are they a busy parent with no time to wait around for a contractor who might show up between noon and 4 PM? Stress that your technicians always show up at a previously scheduled time.

Maybe they’re a college student who needs a durable bag to carry around campus. Highlight your bag’s reinforced seams and strong waxed canvas material.

In this email from Closets by Liberty, the customer testimonial takes up almost the same amount of room as the sale announcement. The combination of a sale announcement followed by a testimonial instantly bolsters a prospective customer’s confidence in the product.

Important Dos and Don’ts During This Stage:

  • DO use customer testimonials or reviews to reassure prospective customers that your product or service is the right choice for them. A little social proof goes a long way.
  • DON’T focus on the same things you did in the understanding phase. Dig a little deeper into what makes you unique to really hook prospective customers.
  • DO segment your email lists and create content tailored to each segment. This will ensure that you get the most from your email nurturing efforts.
  • DON’T try to speak to every individual. Use your audience personas to speak to broader key demographics (parents, college students, homeowners, etc).

Nurture Your Leads the Right Way

With the right lead nurturing, prospective customers will turn into loyal customers and brand ambassadors.

Need help putting this plan into action? We’re here.

  • 6 Reasons to Incorporate Video Into Your Digital Marketing Strategy
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If you’ve spent any time online, you know that video is everywhere. From endlessly scrolling TikTok to rewatching that incredible play from last night’s hockey game or watching your friend’s Instagram stories, it’s hard to not watch videos online. They’re eye-catching and entertaining!

But for businesses and digital marketers, video is a huge marketing tool. 

Why Does Video Marketing Matter?

Put simply, video marketing is versatile and effective. It can be used by nearly every industry on a variety of platforms to serve many audiences and purposes, from long-form videos on YouTube to short-form videos on social media. Whether you want to educate your audience, show your process or simply talk to your customers, video can do it. 

One of the things that’s so great about video is that it can do all of that at any stage of the funnel. Video marketing builds trust, shows your product or service in action, and is incredibly shareable on social media. From explainer videos to nurture someone who is becoming familiar with your brand to testimonial videos that push them to convert, video marketing is a powerful tool no matter where someone is in the marketing funnel.

Let’s take a deeper look at these reasons, plus a few more.

6 Reasons to Start Video Marketing

1. Your Audience Wants Videos

Whether it’s via YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat, TikTok, blogs, emails or your homepage, people want—and consume—video content.

Some interesting stats about consumer behavior and video:

65% of people turn to YouTube to help them fix something in their home or car. (We’ve all headed to YouTube for help to fix a leaky sink or change a headlight, right?) How-to videos, also called “self-directed learning,” are a huge marketing tool for service-based industries or even ecommerce businesses that may need to provide extra instruction for their product.


Emails with video are shown to improve click-through rates by 65%. This doesn’t mean that you need to put a video in every piece of email marketing, but it does mean that when you really want your message to make an impact, video can help.

2. It Drives Conversions

People are 144% more likely to purchase if there is a video associated with a product or service. For ecommerce businesses, this could be as simple as a short video showing your product being used or worn. If you’ve done any online shopping recently, you’ve probably noticed that many retailers include videos of real people wearing their clothes or shoes on their product pages. When customers can get a clear idea of what an item looks like on someone and how it fits, they’re more likely to buy. On landing pages, videos can increase conversions by 80% or more.

For service-based businesses, explainer videos are a great way to inform customers and increase conversions. Explainer videos are exactly what they sound like: videos that explain a service or product. They’re short, typically 30-90 seconds long, and give a high-level overview of your service and how it works. It’s essentially your elevator pitch.

 

3. Videos Create Connection & Credibility

Part of the reason video performs so well is that it allows you to create a connection with your audience by putting a face and a voice to your company. (Or multiple faces and voices.)

Video marketing also helps establish credibility and trust. Whether you create explainer videos, how-tos, or even video testimonials from clients and customers, video marketing goes a long way in proving your business is trustworthy.

 

4. Videos Can Help Improve SEO

Video can improve your site’s SEO in two ways:

Adding video to your website decreases the bounce rate and keeps people on your site longer. In fact, people tend to stay on a page with video 1.4x longer than pages without. Since time on page is one of Google’s ranking factors, video, along with proper optimization, can help boost your site in search results.

In addition to increasing time on page, optimized videos can rank on Google, giving you another opportunity to get a featured snippet spot. Featured snippets appear at or near the top of search results, which means instant eyes on your content.

5. Videos Are a Hit on Social Media

With the rise of TikTok during the pandemic, other social media platforms have tried to mimic the video-only platform. Facebook and Instagram Reels and YouTube Shorts were created in an attempt to capitalize on TikTok’s popularity and hopefully bring a little of that non-stop scrolling to those platforms.

And there’s no shortage of ways to share videos on social media:

  • Facebook – in posts, stories and on Facebook Live
  • Instagram – in posts, stories and Reels 
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • TikTok (need TikTok inspiration?)

The Key to Video Marketing

There is one thing to keep in mind when it comes to video marketing: like most forms of marketing, it’s only effective if it’s authentic.

Authenticity is key on social media, thanks in part to TikTok’s popularity. That means you no longer need a six-figure budget to produce great video content. You just need useful, informative or entertaining content (preferably all three!)

  • What Do Consumers Want From Your Marketing Emails? We Decided To Find Out. (Part 1)
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By Megan Burgess, Content Strategist

It’s no secret that email marketing is an effective strategy with one of the highest ROIs ($36 return for every $1 spent). 

But how can you make the most of your email marketing efforts? By better understanding your audience and what they want. And luckily, we’ve done some of this research for you.

To better understand consumer email marketing preferences, we surveyed 1,760 adults worldwide. Read on to see what they had to say about their email marketing preferences, including exactly what they want in their inbox and what warrants hitting the “unsubscribe” button.

Small Business vs. Big Business

Do customers want to hear from your small business? Or are they only interested in emails from their favorite chain stores and restaurants? The answer may surprise you…

  • 37.8% reported subscribing to marketing emails from both small, local businesses and nationwide or regional chains
  • 34.8% said that they are only subscribed to marketing emails from local businesses
  • 27.3% reported only being subscribed to marketing emails from nationwide or regional chains

Key takeaway: It doesn’t matter what size your business is; customers want to hear from you! You’re never too small, or too large, to invest in email marketing.

What a Customer Wants

When creating marketing emails, it’s easy to create the ‌content you want people to receive. But sometimes that doesn’t line up with what the customer wants. When that happens, your marketing efforts aren’t nearly as effective.

So, what do customers want in their inbox? We gave them three options and told them to choose all that apply:

  • 82.4% said they look for special offers or discounts
  • 53% said they like to receive brand news
  • 14.5% said they like to see behind-the-scenes content

Key takeaway: Customers like when something is in it for them, especially a discount. If you can’t give discounts regularly, brand or product news is also engaging for many customers.

This email from Closets by Liberty gets right to the point: announcing their summer sale. And if you’re wondering what to do for lunch, this Guasaca email lets you know where you can get one of the hottest lunch deals in Raleigh.

Do Emails Equal Sales?

Does email marketing drive sales? Yes! When asked if they had made a purchase as a direct result of a marketing email…

  • 81.6% said they have made a purchase from a marketing email at least once

When we break it down by age group, we can see that the age groups with the most buying power report making more than one purchase from email. Here’s the breakdown of 35- to 64-year-olds that reported making at least one purchase as a direct result of email marketing:

  • 40% of 35-44 year olds
  • 45% of 45-54 year olds
  • A whopping 47% of 55-64 year olds

Key takeaway: Email is an effective way to drive sales—including repeat sales—for direct-to-consumer and ecommerce businesses. This is especially true for demographics with the most buying power.

Tailor-Made Content

If you segment your email list, you may think you’re doing enough to tailor your marketing emails. But according to our respondents, it may not be enough. When asked how often they feel like marketing emails are tailored to them, here’s what we found:

  • 65.5% of respondents said that emails never or rarely feel tailored to them

To explore this a bit more, we asked people what brands could do to make marketing emails feel more customized. Responses fell into a few categories:

Content Based on Behavior

When it comes to customization, many survey takers want companies to use their browsing and shopping behaviors to tailor content. Here are some of the things they had to say:

  • “Send emails about things I have browsed on their website, give special discount code for things I currently have in my cart.”
  • “The business should look at my search history and purchases and send me information or deals related to those items or similar items.”
  • “Notice that I buy on sale so send me an email about a sale that begins in a day.”

This Airbnb email with a San Francisco itinerary is a great example of content based on user behavior, while West Elm does a great job of reminding people what they were shopping for.

Sales & Deals

It’s no secret that people love saving money! And as we mentioned, people love getting sales and discounts sent right to their inbox. From our respondents:

  • “Send coupons or sale info, I am a bargain hunter!”
  • “Go through your purchasing history and give offers based on things that you tend to buy”
  • “Send coupons for the items I normally purchase.”

Content Based on Past Purchases

While concerns about privacy on the internet are increasing, plenty of people reported wanting businesses to use their shopping history to create hyper-tailored email content. Here’s what some of them had to say:

  • “Send marketing emails based on my purchases and interests with discounts.”
  • “Remind me of an old purchase and suggest a related new purchase.”
  • “Sending announcements for expansions/add-ons to products I already own. Recommending other products, similar to what I’ve already bought or shopped for. Notifications for sales on items I’ve shown interest in, or on items related to previous purchases.”

Key takeaway: There is always room for more email personalization. Think about how you can make your emails feel more customized and less like mass communications. Are you using personalization fields? How about segmenting your emails by location or by purchase frequency so you can deliver more customized content? Any one of these goes a long way in making your emails feel more personalized for the customer. (Check out our blog post about email nurture strategies for more ideas!)

Unsubscribe Here

We don’t like to think about it, but we all lose subscribers now and then. While we can’t often pinpoint an exact reason, our findings shed light on the motivation behind unsubscribes. Here’s what we learned:

  • 77.4% said the business sends too many emails
  • 52.3% said they unsubscribe because the content isn’t what they thought it would be
  • 43.2% unsubscribe when they no longer shop/dine there or use a business’s services

Key takeaway: Sending emails too frequently is a surefire way to lose subscribers. We recommend sending no more than once a week, although twice a month tends to be the sweet spot. And always be upfront about what kind of content you’ll be sending. For example, don’t promise exclusive deals just to get sign-ups if you know you won’t be sending deals!

Email Habits

In addition to learning about consumer preferences, we wanted to gain more insight into email preferences and behaviors. By learning more about how people check their email, we can better understand our own email marketing statistics. To help us get there, we asked about email notifications and the devices people use to check their email most often.

Email Notifications

Do people have their email notifications turned on? The answer is a resounding “yes!”

  • 80.7% of people reported having email notifications enabled on their mobile devices

For those that utilize email notifications, we wanted to know if they wait to open the email, or if they do it as soon as they see the notification.

  • 47.3% of people said they open the email as soon as the notification appears
  • 35.1% said it depends on the sender
  • 17.6% of people said they don’t open emails immediately

Key Takeaway: The majority of your audience will be notified of your email as soon as it lands in their inbox—and there’s a good chance they’ll open it when they see the notification come through.

Mobile is King

When asked what device they check their email on most often, it was no surprise that most people check email on their phone:

  • 64.6% said they check their email on their phone most often
  • 29.8% reported using their desktop or laptop to check their email the most
  • 5.6% said they check their email on a tablet most of the time

Key Takeaway: Design your emails with mobile in mind, but don’t neglect the desktop experience.

Make the Most of Your Email Marketing

Ready to invest in email marketing services for your business? TriMark is here to help. Contact us to learn more about our work and how we can elevate your business.

And if you enjoyed the information here, stay tuned for part two of our email marketing research!

  • How to Create an Email Nurture Strategy
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As much as we’d like customers to purchase our product the first time they see it, we know that’s not the case. In fact, the “rule of 7” states that, on average, people need to see an ad or message at least seven times before they take action. Those messages could come in the form of advertisements, social media posts and emails. 

The most effective way to get your message across? Email.

It’s the best way to nurture your leads, and it consistently provides the highest ROI of any marketing tactic.

gmail home screen

What is Lead Nurturing?

At its core, lead nurturing is building relationships with potential customers.

The messaging that your company puts out establishes, strengthens and maintains that relationship. A successful lead nurturing campaign makes your brand more memorable and increases sales.

Why Nurture via Email

Email is just one way to nurture leads. You can also retarget them with ads on social media, display or search and even send mailers. But email marketing has the highest ROI, generating approximately $42 of revenue for every $1 spent.

That makes email marketing the most cost-effective way to nurture leads, but that’s not the only reason to create a lead nurturing strategy. Here are three more reasons that nurturing with email is king:

  • Email is 40X better at acquiring new customers than Facebook or Twitter.
  • Nurtured leads tend to make larger purchases (47% larger, on average) because they have more trust in your brand. 
  • People want to hear from you! When surveyed, just over 60% of people said they want to hear from companies they do business with at least weekly. 91% said they want to receive promotional emails at least monthly.
person online shopping with credit card

How to Build a Lead Nurturing Email Strategy

Whether you’ve never built a lead nurturing email campaign or you’d like to revamp your current campaign, you’re in the right place! Here’s our step-by-step guide to building an effective email nurture campaign:

1. Set a Goal

Like any marketing initiative, the first step is identifying your goal. What do you want from this campaign? Higher sales or conversions and increased website traffic are two common, concrete goals, but an additional goal could be to educate your audience about your unique product or service.  

2. Understand Your Buyer’s Journey

Understanding the way your audience interacts with your brand and purchases your product is key, especially when creating a lead nurturing strategy. Here are some questions to consider to better understand your buyer’s journey:

  • How long does it typically take someone who becomes aware of your brand to become a customer?
  • How much information do your customers need before they purchase?
  • What kind of information do they need to become a customer?

For service-based businesses, letting customers know what they can expect at important points throughout their buying journey is a great way to nurture them:

3. Identify Your Audience(s)

The most effective campaigns have a clearly defined audience. And in some cases, it’s most effective to have more than one audience. 

Segmenting your audience—or dividing it up based on factors that impact their buyer’s journey—is a surefire way to improve the effectiveness of your emails. In fact, segmented campaigns can lead to as much as a 760% increase in revenue. Even simply personalizing the subject line can result in a 50% higher open rate. 

There are nearly endless ways to segment your audience, but here are some common segments:

  • Geographic location
  • Purchase history
  • Browsing behavior
  • Gender
  • Stage of the sales funnel
  • Email engagement, like those that regularly click links in your emails

There is no best way to segment an email audience; it all depends on your product or service. For example, KOHLER Generators segments its audience based on geographic location to better speak about the factors that may lead someone to need a generator:

For your business, it may make more sense to segment based on purchase history or browsing behavior. It’s all about what allows you to best speak to your customers.

4. Create a Schedule

In a lead nurturing drip campaign, you’ll probably send emails every few days for a limited time. From there, we recommend sending weekly, bi-weekly or monthly emails to keep your subscribers engaged and your brand top-of-mind. Sending emails too frequently can be annoying, leading customers to unsubscribe.

To determine how frequently you should send marketing emails, think about how often you can realistically create good, valuable content and how often your customers really need to hear from you. Sending subpar emails just for the sake of appearing in someone’s inbox isn’t an effective strategy. In addition, sending more information than your customers need will only leave them feeling overwhelmed rather than educated.

woman with calendar

5. Create a Content Calendar

Your content calendar will combine your schedule with the topics your emails will address. Here are some things to consider when choosing email topics:

  • What type of content does your audience need to move through the purchase funnel? What product or service features can you highlight?
  • What are the most visited pages on your site? This will help you understand the type of information people are looking for.
  • What insights can you use? Your community management and sales teams can provide valuable insights into your customer’s mind.
  • What are some of the most searched keywords in your industry? Although keywords don’t impact email marketing, it’s a great way to create content that people are actively searching for.

When brainstorming content ideas, think about the marketing emails you receive that appeal most to you. See if you can apply these findings to your own email campaigns.

Part of creating your content calendar is creating enticing subject lines. 47% of people say they open an email based on the subject line alone, so it’s important to spend time on your subject lines instead of making them an afterthought.  

6. Send!

Once your emails are written and designed, it’s time to send! Most email marketing platforms allow you to create drip campaigns and customer journeys that will automatically send emails based on certain “triggers.” For instance, you can automatically send a follow-up email a few days after a purchase or an email with a coupon code for an abandoned cart. For monthly newsletters or one-off emails, send them manually or schedule them according to the calendar you set.

Want More Marketing Tips?

Step up your campaigns with our guide to user-generated content and our tips on how to successfully launch a new product.

  • 5 Tips For Better CTAs
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A call to action (CTA) is a vital part of any content strategy. Without a strong call to action, readers may not understand what to do next, causing them to fall right out of the marketing funnel.

To keep customers in your orbit and guide them through the buying process, understanding what makes a good CTA—and how to create one—is key. Let’s talk about what exactly CTAs are and how to craft great ones.

What is a Call to Action?

A call to action (CTA) is a piece of writing that directs the reader to take action. Some of the most common examples of CTAs are:

  • Buy Now
  • Get Started
  • Read More
  • Learn More

Those follow the standard CTA best practices: they’re clear and start with a strong command word.

But they’re not the most exciting. They’re also not as effective as they could be. 

Let’s talk about how to improve your CTAs, and by extension, your click-through and conversion rates.

How to Write Better CTAs

1. Lean into FOMO

The fear of missing out (FOMO) is a powerful marketing tactic and it’s especially useful when writing calls to action. When you apply FOMO, you make readers feel as if they’ll regret not taking advantage of your offer. This is most commonly used in ecommerce, since sales are limited-time offers, and naturally lend themselves to feeling like you’ll miss out by not taking advantage.

But even if you’re not in ecommerce, you can weave FOMO into your CTAs! Instead of focusing on when your offer ends, try thinking about what would make your reader feel like they need to act now. What problem will your product or service immediately solve?

A great example of this is the CTA on Window World of Colorado’s energy savings calculator. After determining roughly how much you could save on your energy bills when you switch to energy-efficient windows, they call on you to “start saving today”, which reinforces the idea that if you don’t click, you’ll miss out on serious savings.

2. Speak in First-Person

When writing CTAs, try shifting from second-person (you language) to first-person (I, we, me, my language). Why? Research has shown that click-through rates increased by as much as 90% (!) by making this simple shift. Making this change also humanizes your brand and brings your language closer to the way we speak, which builds a closer connection to your audience and makes you sound more relatable.

Here are some examples of traditional vs. first-person CTAs:

Shop DealsShow Me The Deals

Read More I Want More Info

Get Started I’m Ready

4. Don’t Be Afraid of the Exclamation Point

While an exclamation point isn’t always appropriate, there are plenty of times that it is! A well-placed exclamation point can make your CTA more engaging and generate excitement. Just use exclamations sparingly, since overusing them may overwhelm your readers—and if everything gets an exclamation point, it waters down the excitement.

5. Get Playful

Loosen up a bit, ditch the corporate-speak and get more playful with the language in your CTAs. Playful CTAs are quirky, inviting, conversational and may even pull in cultural references, like this example from a Kohler LuxStone email.

5. Make Your CTA a Question

CTA best practices say to start with a strong verb (read, get, learn, shop), but what if we threw that tried-and-true advice out the window and asked a question instead? Turning your traditional CTA into a question elicits a response from the reader, instantly making your content more engaging. 

Instead of telling someone to “Read More,” how about asking “Want More Information?”

And instead of “Request a Quote,” try “How Much Will This Cost?”

To turn your CTAs into questions, write or type up a list of the CTAs you use most frequently. Going down the list, turn each CTA into a question about your product or service. 

Step up Your Digital Marketing

Engaging CTAs are just one part of the puzzle. Improve your digital marketing efforts with tips on email accessibility, social media trends and how to use user-generated content

  • User-Generated Content: Why You Should Be Using It (And How to Get Started)
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By Megan Burgess, Content Strategist

We’ve all seen someone share their favorite Starbucks drink, a skincare product they love, or their new golf clubs on social media. Maybe they tagged the brand in the hopes of getting a like or a share. Whether they know it or not, they just created user-generated content for the brand.

User-generated content can be a gold mine for your brand—but only if you use it!

We’ll get into how to make it work for you, but first, let’s talk about what user-generated content is.

What is User-Generated Content and Why is it Important?

User-generated content (UGC) is exactly as the name suggests: unsponsored or unpaid content created by people that use your product or service. UGC can come in many forms, but the most common are social posts, testimonials or reviews, and YouTube videos. 

Authenticity is key in 21st-century marketing. In fact, 90% of consumers say that authenticity is important, with 79% saying that UGC impacts their purchasing decisions. Consumers want to see social proof, or proof that people have purchased and found value in a product, before purchasing.

This is especially true for online shopping. Reviews and user-generated content ease our pre-purchase anxieties and typically prove that the item in question is worth it. For business owners and marketers, this means higher conversions (AKA more sales).

For marketers, user-generated content is one of the greatest assets a brand can leverage. In a recent survey, 93% of marketers agreed that consumers trust user-generated content more than brand-generated content. This isn’t just because people are talking about your product, but because user-generated content is a great way to build trust in your product, encourage engagement, and create a community online. In addition, UGC is arguably the best form of social proof for a brand. 

How to Get More Reviews

You’re probably thinking “user-generated content sounds great, but how do I get it?” After all, you can’t force anyone to leave a review or post about your business. But you can encourage it and make it easy for them. There are a few ways to do it:

Ask For It

Sometimes getting what you want really is as easy as asking for it! To get more customer feedback, Kohler Generators created a paid social campaign encouraging customers to share their experiences, such as the peace of mind they get from their KOHLER generator and how it has helped them weather storms. With the customer’s permission, those testimonials were used in paid social ads and email campaigns.

kohler generators testimonial

Use UGC

By using UGC, you can get more of it. Let us explain. You can encourage customers to create more UGC by leveraging the user-generated content you already have. When you repost that Instagram story or a photo your business was tagged in, it encourages others to share content with you. It’s an easy way to turn customers into advocates for your brand. Brands like Wayfair regularly share UGC, allowing customers to see Wayfair’s furniture and decor in real homes and imagine it in their own home.

wayfair instagram post

Incorporate UGC Into Your Post-Purchase Communication

Your receipts, invoices, and post-purchase emails are a great way to passively encourage people to leave reviews or talk about your business on social media. Make it easy on your customer by including your brand hashtag or by creating a QR code that leads directly to your review platform, Facebook page, or Instagram account (like the email below). Paired with a call to action and placed on your post-purchase/service communications, your customers will have everything they need to leave a review.

How to Use UGC

Now that you’re working on building your library of user-generated content, let’s look at a few ways to put it to work for you.

Organic Social Posts

This is the default way to use UGC—and for good reason. Repurposing a customer’s content in organic social posts is a great way to share their content with your audience. Ulta Beauty does this really well, both using UGC and encouraging users to share their Ulta finds with the hashtag #ultabeauty. By reposting photos and Reels on their Instagram account, customers are able to see a wide range of people using their products. They use the #regram hashtag and tag the original creator to let followers know this is UGC.

Paid Social Posts

Take the next step with your UGC by utilizing it in paid social campaigns. High-quality photos can be used as your creative, while short and snappy reviews or testimonials are a great way to add some social proof to your ads. Here’s how Kohler Generators used positive reviews to create social ads.

Long-Form Media 

Customer stories are a great addition to your blog (which can then be shared on social media, allowing you to truly make the most of your UGC)! The idea is to interview a customer so they can share more about their experience with your business. You’ll then use the information gathered in this interview to write a blog post telling their story. 

This approach is best for customers with a bigger story to tell. Perhaps they’re an exceptionally loyal customer and are willing to talk about why they keep coming back to you, or maybe your product or service solved a major problem in their life. A great example of this is this blog post with a video testimonial from Window World of Baton Rouge. The customer was looking to make his home more resilient against hurricanes and used Window World’s Impact Resistant Windows to achieve that goal. Watch the video below.

 

With user-generated content, you can create a more authentic online presence for your brand. With that comes community, engagement, and more customers. How will you incorporate user-generated content into your marketing strategy?